I adapted one of James St. James’ stories about Michael Alig from his book Disco Bloodbath (the book from which the movie Party Monster was made). I researched the actual event, as there’s actually video of the party, and tried to get things as right as I could. This was a lot of fun to make, and I’d love to adapt the whole book. I took the words directly out of the book, and James’ writing style is so perfect for visual adaptation. 

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Yinka Shonibare

A British artist of Nigerian descent, Shonibare (b. 1962) creates work that cites the artistic and intellectual history of Europe. His sculptures—life-sized mannequins clothed in the Dutch wax fabrics associated with Africa—offer a dramatic, playful, irreverent examina­tion of identity, history, and politics.Yinka Shonibare MBE’s decapitated mannequins in their vibrant batik fabric outfits cavort through a collage of influences that the British-born, Nigeria-raised artist has excavated from the complicated history of culture.

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Tauba Auerbach Monoprints

Tauba began by embossing paper.  She wasn’t trying to mimic her fold paintings or any other work. She visited a hardware store and purchased a number of ordinary items, including a wire grid, a rubber mat, textured plexiglass, and chicken wire. She then ran sheets of paper through the press over these objects to create grids, parallel lines and patterns.
The raking color seen in the prints is the result of using an airbrush at an oblique angle against the ridges created by the embossment. She would spray a few layers of paint, wait for them to dry, and then proceed. In some cases when the paper got wet, it began to undulate. Auerbach wanted to record that change, which resulted in a topological record.
Eventually the paper was gently flattened.  Similar to her fold paintings, the undulations disappear as physical forms and remain recorded in the paint.